The Black Catalogue
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The Black Catalogue
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magictransistor:

Paul Laffoley. Mind-Body Alpha. 1989


Wow
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Defining Detroit Techno: The Retrospectives And Reissues Of 2013
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50watts:

Keiichi Tanaami, Killer Joe’s Eary Times 1965-1973 via Brickbat Books
50watts:

Keiichi Tanaami, Killer Joe’s Eary Times 1965-1973 via Brickbat Books
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prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here
prostheticknowledge:

Quixter
First-to-market biometric payment system scans your hand of it’s vein layout to identify the customer and their account.
To those unfamiliar with vein biometrics, the way your veins are structured around your body are more unique than a fingerprint, therefore considered a far more accurate form of personal identification - video from the University of Lund, Sweden below:


Paying for a coffee or lunch by simply scanning your palm still sounds like science fiction to most of us. However, an engineering student at Lund University in Sweden has made it happen - making his the first known company in the world to install the vein scanning technique in stores and coffee shops.

[Link]
Link to Quixter’s website can be found here
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dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
dynamicafrica:

In photo: Portraits taken by German photographer Mario Gerth in Angola, Kenya and Ethiopia.
A part-time banker and photojournalist, Gerth has traveled to over 60 countries, extensively taking portraits of various ethnic groups throughout parts of Africa.
In my exposure to the work of Gerth and other Western photographers like him, such as Sam Barker, Joey Lawrence and Eric Lafforgue, I’ve often wondered what motivates these individuals to select these specific groups of people to document. Often times the same ethnic groups seem to be chosen over and over again. More importantly, the relationship between those pictured and those behind the lens more than raises my curiosity. Questions of power, agency, framing and history often swirl in my mind when I come across project such as these, no matter how beautiful they seem. It would be interesting to see a documentary that both revealed and dissected this process and see how these communities are affected by it.
Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?

“Are these photos birthed out of fascination for the ‘other’, or the preservation of at risk communities?”
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themelbournesupremacy:

Bold & beautiful @thirddrawerdown #grevillestreet #prahran #thirddrawerdown (at Third Drawer Down)
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ageofdestruction:

cassandra: Surface of Mercury, photographed by MESSENGER, 17th August 2013.
13 images taken over about 3 minutes. The increasing skew of the images reflects the changing angle between the spacecraft and terrain. Covers about 35 to 49°N, 270 to 280°W; craters are unnamed.
Image credit: NASA/APL/CIW. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.
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sekigan:

Burning Man 2013 Mirror face | Cyberpunk | Pinterest
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